Tag: Daniel Sheridan

Wisdom, Virtue, and the Unwritten Foundations of the Constitution

The knowledge of the science of legislation, the character of legislators, and the duty of the citizen determine the character of our government. What were Election Sermons about? One sermon encouraged us to “never elect someone you wouldn’t trust with your personal matters.” Are we looking for “perfect” politicians? Do we change our views after…

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An Introduction into the Separation of Powers

In Christian teaching, Jesus is the lawgiver, judge, and king – He makes, interprets, and executes the laws. The Founders, however, didn’t want these three distinct powers residing in a single person or body in our government. How did the Founders take the best features of democracy, aristocracy, and monarchy, and write them into our…

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OTD: You’re Elected Mr. Lincoln!

On this day, February 13, 1861, a day after his 52nd birthday, Abraham Lincoln is officially recognized as President of these United States. Abraham Lincoln left Springfield on a thirteen-day trip to Washington,  where he would begin serving as our President. He celebrated his 52nd  birthday along the way, being born on February 12, 1809….

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John Adams Defends The Rights Of All Mankind

The Founding Fathers are famous for promoting the rights of Americans based on the laws of nature and nature’s God, but John Adams went further and defended the rights of all humanity. He made his case in writing, especially his work on the Canon and Feudal Laws, which put to shame civil and religious tyrants….

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The Great Charter: The First Great Step In Constitutional Liberty

During the early Middle Ages, English kings were oppressive, and neither the nobles nor the people had any voice in the affairs of state. The nobles despised the absolute rule of the king, and the common people resented the high taxes. The clergy, the nobles, and the middle class concluded that the only way they…

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Plymouth Rock and Stepping Stones

America’s First Written Governing Document What makes America unique in world history is our emphasis on local government and written Constitutions. Written Constitutions mark “a momentous advance in civilization, and it is especially interesting as being peculiarly American.” To keep our civilization advancing, let’s gather up our heritage and pass it on to the next…

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Happy Birthday, United States Marine Corps!

On this day, November 10, 1775, the United States Marine Corps, is born. Thomas Jefferson loved peace, but the pirates of Morocco, Algiers, Tripoli, and Tunis were capturing European and American vessels, dividing the plunder among the robber sovereigns, and then ransoming the crews or selling them into slavery. Some nations, including the United States,…

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OTD: Teddy Roosevelt and the Coal Miners

Was Teddy Roosevelt right or wrong? On this day, October 13, 1902, Teddy Roosevelt, Coal Miners, and the Constitution. In 1902, America was running on coal. But on May 12, coal workers went on strike, calling for better working conditions. They labored sixteen-hour days, exposing themselves to life-threatening dangers for low wages, having received no…

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OTD: Roger Williams Banished

On this day, October 9, 1635, Roger Williams is banished from Massachusetts Bay Colony. The beliefs of Williams upset the very foundations of Puritanism – its church and its colony. Here’s what his “heretical” views were: First: Williams believed every man had the right to practice whatever religion he pleased. A person’s beliefs were a…

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Thanksgiving in October?

The fall has arrived, Halloween is coming, Thanksgiving on its heels, then, before we know it, Christmas will be here. Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July are my two favorite holidays because they are about people – families, neighbors, fellow-countrymen, and the human race at large. You don’t have to worry about shopping for presents…

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